Tech & Science

  • App disrupts health care services in eastern DR Congo’s Goma

    “Wiiqare” allows patients to pay for treatment and drugs on credit

    Read More »
  • How Tanzania’s new Electric Trains will look like

    Tanzania to get new SGR electric trains November The Tanzania Railways Corporation (TRC) has said it will receive first 42…

    Read More »
  • The Namibian Doctor Giving The Blind Chance To See Again!

    Dr. Helena Ndume is a Namibian ophthalmologist who is internationally renowned for her humanitarian work. To date, she has performed…

    Read More »
  • Big day for Bezos: Blue Origin safely lands first crewed mission

    Amazon.com and Blue Origin founder Jeff Bezos and his three crewmates have successfully landed after embarking on a mission 20…

    Read More »
  • Uganda Advances Toward Launching Its First Satellite

    Uganda is venturing into the field of space technology, aiming to launch its first satellite in 2022. The station, located…

    Read More »
  • Nigeria To Implement 5G Technology

    Nigeria To Implement 5G Technology – The mobile communication technology of Nigeria has evolved over the years from 1st generation…

    Read More »
  • MTN to focus on pan-African strategy as it exits the Middle East

    Focus on Africa Africa’s largest mobile operator, and South African telecom giant MTN, announced Thursday it would pull out of…

    Read More »
  • Archaeologists in Algeria discovered stone tools and cut animal bones that may be up to 2.4 million years old

    The tools closely resemble those called Oldowan, found until now mainly in East Africa. “East Africa is widely considered to be the birthplace of stone tool use by our ancient hominid ancestors – the earliest examples of which date as far back as about 2.6 million years ago,” said the report in Science. “The new findings make Ain Boucherit the oldest site in northern Africa with in situ evidence of hominin meat  use with associated stone tools and they suggest that other similarly early sites could be found outside of the  Eastern Africa Rift.” One hypothesis is that early ancestors of modern-day humans quickly carried stone tools with them out of East Africa and into other regions of the continent. Another is a “Multiple origin scenario,” in which early hominids made and used tools in both East and  North Africa. More in the Sahara? The findings suggest that the ancestors of modern people were present in north Africa at least 600,000 years earlier than scientists thought. Until now, the oldest known tools from northern Africa were 1.8 million years old and were found at a nearby site. “Based on the potential of Ain Boucherit and the adjacent sedimentary basins, we suggest that hominin fossils and Oldowan artifacts as old as those documented in East Africa could be discovered in North Africa as well.”

    Read More »
Back to top button